Aquatic Entomology

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FISH LONG & PROSPER !!!

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Aquatic Entomology
Factory Tour
Simms Dry Packs
March Browns
All pictures are Mouse-over.

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Perserved sculpin in a bottle.
Free Field Trip
March 19 - 3:00 pm to 6:00 pm, Saturday Afternoon. 
 
"Identifying Aquatic Trout Foods 101"
This program is for anglers who wish to know more about the habitat that wild trout live in.  Screening will occur on local streams and samples will be collected and identified..
Please bring wading apparel & rain coat.

HAVE A NICE DAY.
Everyone is welcome!

G. Loomis Factory Tour
By J. Morgan Jones

The minute you walk in the door you realize that things are different than you expected.  The atmosphere is calm, but all business.  There are 170+ people working here.  Yet the space is very open and everyone is connected.  Maybe that's the secret.  There are a minimum of walls separating the people from each other.  They are all working together and you are impressed by the fact that they actually seem to like each other.  They build 136,000 fishing rods a year.  That's a bunch.

Is that pretty redhead looking at John Jones?

Mark, Patty and myself received an invite from the G. Loomis Rod Company to come to its Woodland, Washington plant for the nickel tour. (Letís see, a day off from work and free lunch too? After weighing the pros and cons for about 6 seconds, we accepted the offer.) I really did not have much of an idea about what to expect, as I have never been to a rod building facility. Like most people, I had rough idea of what assembling a fishing rod is about, but I have never seen one built from scratch. The Loomis people started us in the front office and we ended our tour in the shipping area, and they took the time to explain the reason for the location and the

operation of every step in the building of a Loomis Rod. We were impressed with plant layout, employee attitude, product quality and the openness of the entire facility. Mark asked if we might be able to take any pictures (for the newsletter) and that he would only shoot what they would give us permission to shoot. We were informed that nothing was off limits to the camera. From what little that I know of rod manufacturers, this is not the common practice. We were able to witness the complete rod building procedure, start to finish.

The first thing upon entering the G. Loomis building is that there are very few private offices. Most office operations are carried in a common area (there are no cubicles at all). This set up allows anyone in the office area to SEE if a certain person is available, on the phone, in or out of meeting. You do not need a conference call to discuss most things, and most customers do not need to be put on hold for any length of time. Office stations that communicate the most

Mike Perusse, Mark Landry & Patty Barnes at the pattern table.

often with certain other stations are located close to each other. This is the identical thought behind the actual manufacturing plant itself. It was pointed out to us that the entire plant was laid out by the people who do the actual production of rods. It seems that the Loomis management thought that the employees might know what they are doing. The end result is that itís obvious they DO know what they are doing. Throughout our visit, employees were productive and efficient and looked to us like they enjoyed what they were doing. I believe that I heard that the average length of employment was at 9 years. In todayís economy, thatís a great record. This lack of turn-over gives G. Loomis a staff of very experienced rod builders, which in turn produces products that are world renowned.  Ten years ago it took 21 days to build a complete rod.  Now it takes four days.

A cross section of rod blanks fresh out of the oven.

The first thing that takes place in the production of a particular rod is demand for that model from anglers such as yourself.  So, the start of a rod to be built is the actual order from a customer. In many cases this order has already been anticipated and the rod is already in stock and shipped immediately.  However a rod to replace that rod is immediately set into production.  The plant is so streamlined that although over 500 models of rods are delivered annually,

production batches may be as few as (4) of a s.k.u.  When an order is received, it is real clear that the G. Loomis people understand that it is the customer that makes all this work. Order information is transferred to a piece of paper that is given to the person(s) who selects the correct graphite type and template pattern for that model. At the first station graphite pre-preg cloth is cut in specific

shapes. This is done one at a time by a highly skilled person.  Sometimes three different pieces of material are used in each section of a rod. At the next station the proper mandrel is selected by another craftsman.  The mandrel is tool steel needle that is the exact size of the inside of the rod. The graphite sheets are attached to the mandrel.  From there it goes to the rolling machine (one of which is the original machine developed by Gary Loomis). Keep in mind that I am simplifying the process in the interest of time constraints, but this (as with many of the procedures in building a Loomis rod) is a very delicate process. The slightest variation in pressure, wrapping or cutting will cause a defective product that may not be discovered until later testing. Last years failure numbers (rods returned from dealers that were untellable due to defects) is about .003%. That is nothing short of amazing! It would seem that there are still people around that care about the product they are producing.  Soon after rolling the

A dedicated craftsman inspecting & measuring.

actual rod, it gets baked in an oven for an exact amount of time, at a specific temperature.  After the mandrel is removed, the rod moves on to the sanding station. It was pointed out to us that the person doing the sanding must be very careful to only sand the outside raw finish of the rod as any

Roaring Rivers freshly wrapped, waiting for final finish.

disturbance of the graphite fibers will ruin the finished rod.  Every rod is measured to assure exact thicknesses.  Trimming the blank, painting and a few other steps I have not mentioned, will get you a finished rod blank, though not a finished rod. The cork in the handle of every G. Loomis GLX fly rod took 90-years to grow on the tree.  The cork handle, reel seat and winding check are installed next and then the tip top (guide) is placed into position. Great care it taken to be sure that the ďspineĒ of the rod is in correct alignment with the reel seat and the top guide. After the G. Loomis logo is silk screened on and the rod it is about ready to have the guides wrapped on. There is a couple of curing stages (of a sort) and processes I have skipped, but, essentially, the rod is done in so far as the construction is concerned.  The last

step before packaging is the final inspection process, and there is more to this than meets the eye. The people at Loomis especially wanted us to see this station, as it seems we had something to do with the way the process was developed. We have a reputation for looking after our customers interest and will only accept the very best that each manufacturer has to offer.  In other words,

Bachmann and the people who work with him at The Fly Fishing Shop have a reputation for being a bunch of "Picky Bastards".  Not too long ago, Loomis shipped us some rods that were new to the market place and we felt that the finish quality was not up to our usual standards. We sent them back for replacement and a few of the replacements were lacking in finish quality also. The guys at G. Loomis were quite surprised, but instead of denial, they said, "Show us what you mean"  That is why G. Loomis products are among the best in the fly fishing arena.  The company is very forward thinking and is constantly evolving.  Let me mention that there was never a question about the strength and quality of the product we were talking about; this was a cosmetics issue only. Still, it was an issue with us. The Loomis people inspected everything we returned, called or came to the shop numerous times, and assured us that it was an issue with them also. They sat down with their own people and came up with a better way to insure product quality. Then they implemented this new program. This took less than a month, start to finish.

Lazer straight.

Problem solved. Very impressive!
We learned a great deal about what goes into building a premium quality fly rod, and that was why the Loomis rod company invited us to their facility. Loomis rods have always been among the best fly rods in the world, and still are, as a matter of fact.  What we saw in Woodland was a world renowned rod company, making high class fishing rods, and in our local area. You can rest assured that if your fly rod is a Loomis, it was built here, in the Pacific Northwest. Local money, spent in the local area. Add to that a company that claims to care about what we think about their product, and then backs it up. Those of you that know me, know that I believe it is not just the fish, itís the fishing that counts. Well, now I know that itís not a just a really nice fly rod, itís a G. Loomis fly rod, and they intended it to be that way.
Thank you for an informative day, Loomis.


Simms Dry Creek Packs
Introduced in 2005, this series of packs takes the storage of your gear in the field to a whole new level of protection from the elements.  All roll up packs can be considered water proof unless subjected to the pressures of deep submersion.  Zippered packs can be considered extremely water repellent.
Camera Bag Lumbar Bag Hip/Chest Pack

Chest Pack

Backpack


Dry Creek Camera Bag
  • Holds digital or 35mm camera
  • Compound curve narrows at top for secure closure
  • Removable foam interior padding
  • Velcro closure is splash proof, roll top and buckle closure allows for dunk
  • Accommodates any Simms wading belt

Colors: Orange, Coal
You can be sure that your camera is safe and dry even while you are wading as long as it is sealed in this waterproof bag.  Accommodates most point & shoot cameras that are used on the water these days.  Also is great storage for other small fragile items.  This is the best built item of its kind that we have found.

Dry Creek Camera Bag

Dry Creek Camera Bag

Item Description Size Price To Top
023389 Simms Dry Creek Camera Bag, Orange one size only $29.95

023396 Simms Dry Creek Camera Bag, Coal one size only $29.95


Dry Creek Lumbar Bag
  • Roll/fanny pack with removable built-in belt with aeromesh padding.
  • Maximum storage front pocket on interior padding, 2 bellowed pockets on interior.
  • Interior bag features continuous wrap-around padding
  • Wing pockets on both sides of belt.

Colors: Orange, Coal
 

Dry Creek Lumbar Bag

Dry Creek Lumbar Bag

Item Description Size Price To Top
100000 Simms Dry Creek Lumbar Bag, Orange one size only $59.95

200000 Simms Dry Creek Lumbar Bag, Coal one size only $59.95


Dry Creek Chest/Hip Pack
  • Zipper closure at top - 10,000 mm rated
  • Stacked outer pockets
  • Removable foam liner
  • Accessories include 2 built-in retractors and tool keeper
  • Cuban-strap system allows for for easy conversion from hip to chest pack
  • Accommodates any Simms belt, attaches to Simms packs

Colors: Orange, Coal

Dry Creek Chest/Hip Pack

Dry Creek Chest/Hip Pack

Item Description Size Price To Top
300000 Simms Dry Creek Chest/Hip Pack, Orange one size only $69.95

400000 Simms Dry Creek Chest/Hip Pack, Coal one size only $69.95


Dry Creek Chest Pack
  • Welded vertical zipper runs from bottom up and over for easy access
  • Front pocket
  • Cuban-strap system
  • Stacks 2 large fly boxes
  • Accommodates any Simms belt, attaches to Simms packs

Colors: Orange, Coal

Dry Creek Chest/Hip Pack

Dry Creek Chest/Hip Pack

Item Description Size Price To Top
500000 Simms Dry Creek Chest Pack, Orange one size only $49.95

600000 Simms Dry Creek Chest Pack, Coal one size only $49.95


Dry Creek Backpack
  • Roll top
  • Splash-proof, zippered outer pocket with zipper garage
  • Aeromesh padded shoulder straps and lumbar back support
  • Partial load - roll down and buckle top
  • Full load - roll down and buckle to side for dunk protection
  • Built in belt strap

Colors: Orange, Coal

Dry Creek Backpack

Item Description Size Price To Top
023464 Simms Dry Creek Backpack, Orange one size only $129.95

223471 Simms Dry Creek Backpack, Coal one size only $129.95


March Brown Mayflies
Oregon is experiencing a warm, dry spring -
perfect conditions for fishing March Brown hatches!

Nymphs Floating Nymphs Duns
Emergers, Sub-Surface Cripples Spinners
March Brown Mayfly from the book: Hatch Guide For Western Streams by Jim Schollmeyer - CLICK HERE ! March Brown Mayfly Hatches
Rhithrogena morrisoni (that's the scientific name)
Western March Browns are your first "easy-to-see" hatch of the new season.  Look for March Brown hatches on local rivers when water temperatures start reaching 42 degrees consistently. This can occur in most lower elevation water sheds in mid-
February and continues through March and early April.  Hatching March Browns can create some very exciting surface film and dry fly fishing. Hatches of duns usually start in the early after noon and spinner falls are in the late evening. 

Pounding the bottom with weighted March Brown Nymph flies can provide constant action from mid-morning into the early stages of the hatch.  The March Brown Nymph in sizes #12 & #14 will be your bread and butter fly.  However nymphal color tends to adapt to the color of the stream bed.  Most March Brown nymphs are dark, some are nearly black.  The #12200 nymph is often the ticket to success.  Sometimes your catch will increase if you thin out the legs with your leader clipper and color them with a black felt marker. Fishing two flies at once will increase your odds of hooking up.  Usually two different colors or sizes are used.  Gold Rib Hares Ear and Olive Hares Ears are valuable flies to have with you and will some times out fish the more realistic patterns.  Most March Brown Nymphs are fairly skinny #14's, but slightly larger flies can also work.  March Brown nymphs live in riffles and fast, rocky runs.  As the nymphs near maturity, they migrate to slower water. During the migration, they can loose their grip and drift in the current.  For this reason trout will congregate in places where fast riffles start to slow down and on the seams between the fast and slow water.  Fish your nymphs where the current changes speed.  Approach the water carefully.  Start by fishing the slower water first with flies that are lightly weighted.  Your flies will be most effective if they are perfectly dead drift.  Cast them slightly upstream and mend a little slack into you presentation.  As you work your way out into the faster current, add lead shot to keep your flies near the bottom.
  
As the water warms at mid-day the nymph rise toward the surface to hatch.  Some of these nymphs are intercepted by trout during this upward migration.  Try tying a March Brown Soft Hackle to a dropper 3' above your nymphs. This technique can pay extra dividends.

As the Duns begin to hatch, trout will rise to the surface to catch them.  This often produces the most visually exciting part of the day.  Big trout rising to March Browns during the peak of the hatch can be very splashy.  Often the rise starts much quieter as trout pick off the emergers just below the surface.  And some duns will emerge from the shuck slightly below the surface. At this time a March Brown Soft Hackle or Flymph fished just below the surface can be your best fly.    The Flymph is often even more effective if you add a March Brown Cripple or dry fly to  a dropper 1' to 3' from your soft hackle and fish both flies dead drift. 

March Browns and their possible related species seem to come in a variety of shades and colors.  That is why there is some disagreement between anglers fishing different watershed as to what the actual colors of March Brown Duns are.  The ones that hatch most often on the Sandy River are brown with mottled wings.  We have seen that same fly on the Deschutes and Clackamas Rivers.  On the Deschutes we have also seen spring time mottled wing mayflies the were grey wing olive.  The trout like both kinds.  Our friends that fish the McKenzie report March browns that are shades of gray.  To be on the safe side you should carry several brown patterns, a blue wing olive parachute and a Parachute Adams in dark tones.  If they are all #14 you're probably in the game.

Duns and emergers produce the best fishing, but some trout will sip spinners in the quietest of water. A March Brown "spinner fall" can extend your fishing day.  Spinner falls usually occur over faster water areas.  However they create the most reliable feeding activity if they raft up in back eddies down stream.  Sometimes the afternoon back eddy rise that you think is midge emergence is actually created by collecting dead March Brown spinners.

Best tackle to fish a March Browns is a 9' #4 or #5 weight rod with an action that works easiest at the 20' to 50' cast range.  I prefer a weight forward line that is a little on the heavy side, is a moderate color and is very clean so that it easily shoots smoothly at all ranges.  The standard 9'-5X trout leader is good starting point.  You might go to 4X if you get brutalized by big fish.  Remember the best fly is the one that is perfectly placed in a risers feeding lane. 
Have a great spring.

Nymphs Floating Nymphs Duns
Emergers, Sub-Surface Cripples Spinners

March Brown Nymph
Pounding the bottom with weighted March Brown Nymph flies can provide constant action from mid-morning into the early stages of the hatch.  The March Brown Nymph in sizes #12 & #14 will be your bread and butter fly for March Browns.  As stated above, you can chop & thin, color and texture your fly to most match the naturals.  You can capture naturals with a kick-screen.

Item Description Size Price To Top
12200-10 March Brown Nymph 10 3 for $5.25

12200-12 March Brown Nymph 12 3 for $5.25

12200-14 March Brown Nymph 14 3 for $5.25

12200-16 March Brown Nymph 16 3 for $5.25


Gold Rib Hares Ear
Nymphal color tends to adapt to the color of the stream bed.  Fishing two flies at once will increase your odds of hooking up.  Usually two different colors or sizes are used.  A Gold Rib Hares Ear is one of those flies that look like a lot of different stream bed insects.  This fly can also be a victim of markers and clippers.  Has caught many trout as-is.
Item Description Size Price To Top
12100-12 Gold Rib Hares Ear Nymph 12 3 for $5.25

12100-14 Gold Rib Hares Ear Nymph 14 3 for $5.25


Olive Hares Ear Nymph
Olive Hares Ears are valuable flies to have with you and will some times will out fish the more realistic March Brown patterns. Some years spring run-offs are small and weed growth starts early (this year)? 
Item Description Size Price To Top
12110-12 Olive Hares Ear Nymph 12 3 for $5.25

12110-14 Olive Hares Ear Nymph 14 3 for $5.25


March Brown Flymph
Often the rise starts quietly as trout pick off the March emergers just below the surface.  At this time a March Brown Flymph fished just below the surface can be your best fly. 
Item Description Size Price To Top
06257-14 March Brown Flymph 14 3 for $5.25


March Brown Soft Hackle
A March Brown Soft Hackle on a dropper 3' above your bottom pounding nymphs can pay extra dividends.  A March Brown Soft Hackle fished just below the surface can be good bet during all stages of the hatch.  
Item Description Size Price To Top
06258-14 March Brown Soft Hackle 14 3 for $5.25


Paranymph, Brown
This is the March Brown May Fly as it hangs in the surface film and is wriggling from the shuck. A Bob Quigley pattern.
Item Description Size Price To Top
Q301-14 Paranymph, Brown 14 3 for $5.25

Q301-16 Paranymph, Brown 16 3 for $5.25


March Brown Cripple
You can fish the cripple like a dry fly by itself or it can be very effective if you add March Brown Cripple to a dropper 1' to 3' from your dry fly and fish both flies dead drift.  A Bob Quigley pattern.

Item Description Size Price To Top
Q1007-14 March Brown Cripple 14 3 for $5.25


Hackle-Stacker Sparkle Dun, March Brown
This is the March Brown May fly as it is sliding out of or is trapped in side the nymphal shuck. A Bob Quigley pattern.
Item Description Size Price To Top
Q1029-14 H.S. Sparkle Dun, March Brown 14 3 for $5.25


Loopwing Paradun, March Brown
This is a realistic pattern that can be very effective under all conditions but especially under the slick water bright light condition where fish can be very wary.  Because this fly is fragile it should be saved for special occasions.  A Bob Quigley pattern.
Item Description Size Price To Top
Q235-14 Loopwing Paradun, March Brown 14 3 for $5.25


March Brown Traditional Dun
This versatile "easy to see" fly is proven under a wide variety of conditions. It may be fished "in the round" or the hackle can be trimmed on the bottom for a lower silhouette. 
Item Description Size Price To Top
3049-14 March Brown Traditional Dun 14 3 for $5.25


March Brown Twilight Hair Wing Dun
This is our most popular dry fly for the March Brown hatch.  The red Antron fibers on the front of the wing help you see the fly.  If you get refusals from the fish, you can clip the bright fibers from the wing.
Item Description Size Price To Top
3051-14 March Brown Twilight Hair Wing Dun 14 3 for $5.25


March Brown Parachute
This very effective low floating quill body dry fly has a wing post made from lightweight highly visible poly.  It is very easy to see, especially on dark overcast days.
Item Description Size Price To Top
3052-14 March Brown Parachute 14 3 for $5.25

3052-16 March Brown Parachute 16 3 for $5.25


Blue Wing Olive Loop Wing Paradun
This is a proven pattern for March browns that are olive tones.  These flies occur on some rivers more frequently than you might expect.
Item Description Size Price To Top
Q210-14 Blue Wing Olive Loop Wing Paradun 14 3 for $5.25


Parachute Adams Traditional, White Wing
This is one of the most popular dry flies in the Pacific Northwest.  It is used to imitate a wide variety of mayfly and caddis species.  It is often the best searching pattern when no surface activity apparent.  The wing is made from white calf body hair.
Item Description Size Price To Top
1034-12 Parachute Adams Traditional, White Wing 12 3 for $5.25

1034-14 Parachute Adams Traditional, White Wing  14 3 for $5.25


March Brown Spinner
A March Brown "spinner fall" can extend your fishing day.  Spinner falls usually occur over faster water areas.  However they create the most reliable feeding activity if they raft up in back eddies down stream.  Sometimes the evening back eddy rise that you think is midge emergence is actually created by collecting dead March Brown spinners.
Item Description Size Price To Top
3057-14 March Brown Spinner 14 3 for $5.25


The Fly Fishing Shop HOME. The Fly Fishing Shop, Welches, OR

1(800) 266-3971

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Fish long & prosper,
Mark Bachmann, Patty Barnes

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